Mexican cuisine – a fusion of the most diverse traditions especially of the indigenous groups that were the inhabitants in the pre-Hispanic epoch and of the Spanish, which in turn had received elements from other cultures – constitutes a topic of great interest. Collections | Roots | Mexican Cooking

 

Mexican Coking

 

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Index

| Introduction:

23 | Mexican Cooking

31 | Main utensils used in Mexican cooking

35 | Seasonings and ingredients

| 1 Traditional Beverages

39 | Flavored waters

40 | Chia (sage seed)

40 | Rice Drink

41 | Roselle water

41 | Prickly pear drink

42 | Tamarind water

42 | Alcoholic beverages

42 | Tepache

43 | Colonche

44 | Flavored pulque

44 | Almod

45 | Melon

45 | Prickly pear

46 | Mixed drinks and cocktails

46 | Angel´s kisses

47 | Tequila cocktail

47 | Margarita

48 | Rompope

49 | Sangrita

Author

Beatriz Cadena

Illustrations:

Heraclio Ramírez


33 Photos-Illustrations
276 Pages
Softcover
22 x 15.6 cm – 8.66 x 6.14 in
ISBN 978 968 6434 59 3


$225.00 Add to cart

Contents

Mexican cuisine – a fusion of the most diverse traditions especially of the indigenous groups that were the inhabitants in the pre-Hispanic epoch and of the Spanish, which in turn had received elements from other cultures – constitutes a topic of great interest.

This bilingual work presents references on its origins, history and evolution, as well as on the most frequently used ingredients and utensils. It includes an exhaustive selection of recipes garnered from different specialties: soups, poultry, sauces, tamales, meats, desserts and many others. To facilitate preparation of the recipes the weights and measures in Spanish are in the metric system and in English in the American system.

This book is essential for those who wish to know and prepare the best and most representative dishes of Mexico’s gastronomic art.

Did you know that mole poblano is one of Mexico’s most representative dishes?

The history of mole goes back to pre-Columbian times when the Aztecs prepared for the great lords a complex dish called mulli, which meant potage or mixture. The dish used turkey meat and chocolate (mole de guajolote), two products that originated in Mesoamerica. Mole, as we know it today, is the result of a slow culinary process that began in the pre-Hispanic epoch and was perfected in the Colonial period, when Mexican cuisine was enriched with Asian and European elements.

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