The Mayas developed over an area of 400,000 km2 (154,441 mile2) and their civilization was made up of ethnological groups that spoke various languages (cakchiquel, chontal, tzeltal, quiché, etc.), all of which descended from an original tongue that was used in the third millennium B.C. The origins of this culture go back to 550 B.C. when certain unmistakable Mayan traits can be recognized. Since that time, and until the Spaniards’ arrival, we can follow a historical trajectory that converted the Mayan civilization into Mesoamerica’s most refined. Collections | Mexico Full Color | The Mayas

The Mayas

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Index

3    | Introduction

5    | Geography of the area

10  | Cultural Influences

15  | Social Organization

19  | Religion

16  | Scientific Knowledge

35  | The Ball-Game

39  | Headdresses and Costume

42  | Fauna

42  | Dwelings

46  | Sculpture, Semi-precious stones, Engraving, Gold and Silver work

66  | Paiting

68  | Pottery

81  | Architecture

121| The Mayas today

127| Glossary

Author

Mercedes de la Garza

Photos by:

Walter Reuter, Enrique Franco Torrijos, Guillermo Aldana


203 Photos-Illustrations
128 Pages
Softcover
26 x 20 cm – 10.24 x 7.87 in
ISBN 968 6434 26 7


Other languages
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$379.00 Add to cart

Contents

The Mayas developed over an area of 400,000 km2 (154,441 mile2) and their civilization was made up of ethnological groups that spoke various languages (cakchiquel, chontal, tzeltal, quiché, etc.), all of which descended from an original tongue that was used in the third millennium B.C. The origins of this culture go back to 550 B.C. when certain unmistakable Mayan traits can be recognized. Since that time, and until the Spaniards’ arrival, we can follow a historical trajectory that converted the Mayan civilization into Mesoamerica’s most refined.

Furthermore, this culture did not disappear with the arrival of the Europeans. In fact, in many ways the Mayas’ customs (food, music, dress, housing, languages, etc.) have endured to this day.

This book attests to that. On one hand, the images document Mayan architecture, pottery, painting and sculpture from all angles and, on the other, the text collects all the information related to their scientific knowledge, religion, social organization and geographical milieu. It comes as absolutely no surprise that one of their most emblematic cities, Chichén Itzá, is now considered one of the seven new wonders of the world.

Did you know that all the pre-Hispanic Mayan codices are conserved in only three.

Each one takes the name of the cities where they are found: The Dresden Codex (Germany) contains a calendar and the Mayan numerical system, the Madrid Codex includes astrological tables and the Paris Codex deals with ritual affairs, gods, ceremonies and a type of 364-day zodiac.

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