Teotihuacán is undoubtedly the city par excellence of Ancient Mexico and the first that was fully planned and urbanized. In its apogee (350 to 550 A.D.) it covered an area of about 22 km2 (8.5 mile2), with a population of roughly 200,000 inhabitants. Most of the housing apartment complexes within the urban area and the foreigners’ districts belong to this phase.
Collections|Mexico Full Color| Teotihuacan

Teotihuacan

Take a look inside. ↓

Index
  • Introduction  3
  • THE TEOTIHUACAN CULTURE  5
  • MAP: SITES IN MESOAMERICA INFLUENCED BY TEOTIHUACAN  14
  • THE CITADEL  18
  • TEMPLE OF QUETZALCOATL  21
  • AVENUE OF THE DEAD  25
  • PYRAMID OF THE SUN  35
  • PYRAMID OF THE MOON  41
  • THE QUETZAL-PAPALOTL  47
  • TEMPLE OF THE FEATHERED CONCHES  52
  • TEMPANTITLA  54
  • TETITLA  61
  • ATETELCO  63
  • ZACUALA  66
  • YAYAHUALA  67
  • THE MUSEUM  68

Author

Jorge Angulo

Photos by:

Giovanni Dagli Orti, Michael Calderwood, Enrique Franco Torrijos


92 Photos-Illustrations
80 Pages
Softcover
26 x 20 cm – 10.24 x 7.87 in
ISBN 968 6434 42 9


Other languages
Englishfrançais Deutsch日本人

$299.00 Add to cart

Contents

Teotihuacán is undoubtedly the city par excellence of Ancient Mexico and the first that was fully planned and urbanized. In its apogee (350 to 550 A.D.) it covered an area of about 22 km2 (8.5 mile2), with a population of roughly 200,000 inhabitants. Most of the housing apartment complexes within the urban area and the foreigners’ districts belong to this phase.

In contrast to what occurred in the rest of Mesoamerica, where most people lived in huts, almost all the inhabitants of Teotihuacán lived in large apartment complexes such as those that can be visited in Tetitla, Atetelco and Tepantitla.

It was the largest city in Mesoamerica and its trade relations went as far as Honduras. In many senses, Teotihuacán, the City of the Gods (or where the gods are born) is a monumental city that modeled Mesoamerican culture. All of its buildings, such as the Temple of the Feathered Conches, the Temple of Quetzalcóatl, the Palace of the Jaguars, and of course the Pyramids of the Sun and Moon, are conceived as voluminous constructions, a proportional reflection of its regional hegemony.

This book describes in detail each of the buildings that rise along the Avenue of the Dead, from the Citadel to the Palace of Tetitla, where the mural painting is brilliant, and from the Quetzal-Papalotl to Tepantitla, where the famous Tlalocan or Paradise of Tlatloc is located.

Teotihuacán has always held a particular fascination, so much so that since 1864, when the first official exploration took place, archeological research has never been interrupted, perhaps because this city has still not revealed all of its secrets.

This book describes in detail each of the buildings that rise along the Avenue of the Dead, from the Citadel to the Palace of Tetitla, where the mural painting is brilliant, and from the Quetzal-Papalotl to Tepantitla, where the famous Tlalocan or Paradise of Tlatloc is located.

Teotihuacán has always held a particular fascination, so much so that since 1864, when the first official exploration took place, archeological research has never been interrupted, perhaps because this city has still not revealed all of its secrets.

Did you know that Teotihuacán, “City where the gods are born”, is the name given to one of the greatest cities of Mesoamerica.

 

It developed over a period of more than seven centuries (100 B.C. to 750 A.D.) and left a deep imprint throughout Mesoamerica, even in places as far away as Guatemala and Honduras.

Share This