Mexico City’s National Museum of Anthropology is considered one of the most notable works of contemporary Mexican architecture and is also one of the most harmonious frameworks conceived to exhibit pieces of Ancient Mexico. Collections | Cultural Guides | National Museum of Anthropology

National Museum of Anthropology

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Index

4   | National Museum of Anthropology

6   | Intrudiccion to Anthropology

7   | Mesoamerica

7   | Map of regions of Mesoamerica

8   | Origins

10 | Pre-Classic

12 | Teotihuacan

18 | Toltec

21 | Mexica

26 | Oaxaca

30 | Gulf Coast

35 | Maya

40 | Northern Mexico

41 | Western Mexico

45 | Ethnography

Author

Felipe Solis

Photos by:

Giovanni Dagli Orti, Michel Zabé, Irmgard Groth


84 Photos-Illustrations
48 Pages
Softcover
22 x 12.5 cm – 8.66 x 4.92 in
ISBN 978 968 6434 98 9


Other languages
Englishfrançais Deutsch Italiano Nederlands 日本人 中国

$99.00 Add to cart

Contents

Mexico City’s National Museum of Anthropology is considered one of the most notable works of contemporary Mexican architecture and is also one of the most harmonious frameworks conceived to exhibit pieces of Ancient Mexico.

The most important works of archeology and pre-Hispanic art, as well as testimonies of daily and ritual life of contemporary indigenous groups, are housed in the National Museum of Anthropology, built in Chapultepec Park and projected by architect Ramírez Vázquez.

A complete guide on the National Museum of Anthropology of Mexico City, the best in the world in its specialty!

After an introduction on the creation of the museum and a location map of the regions of Mesoamerica the tour begins in the hall of origins; this is followed, room by room, by all the cultures of Mexico, from the Olmecs to the Aztecs. At the end, the guide includes photographs and an explanation of the ethnography rooms where the popular art of Mexico’s current indigenous groups are collected.

Through its pages and led by selected illustrations of the pieces exhibited in the different rooms, the reader can become familiar with the cultures that flourished in pre-Hispanic Mexico.

The text and the illustration captions written by a well-known specialist, fully complete knowledge of the topic.

Did you know that the sculpture of Tláloc (god of rain) that rises at the entrance of the museum’s esplanade, stands 7 m (23 ft) tall, weighs 168 tons and was brought from a town 50 km (31 Mile) away from Mexico City.

Ironically in the early morning on April 16, 1964, the god of rain was met by an extremely strong storm, unusual for that time of year

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