This guide documents with its photographs and illustrations all the historical phases of the city. In Cuicuilco, Templo Mayor or Tlatelolco some of the buildings of the pre-Hispanic cultures of the Valley of Mexico are still conserved. In the Historical Center you can visit, among other innumerable sites, the Cathedral, the Casa de los Azulejos, Santo Domingo Plaza or the College of San Ildefonso, buildings that still have viceregal resonance. Of the modern capital we can mention the National Museum of Anthropology, University City, the National Auditorium, the Tamayo Museum or the Latin-American Tower. In fact what is extraordinary is the possibility of being at all the historical stages of Mexico’s capital at the same time. Collections | Cultural Guides | Mexico City

Mexico City

Take a look inside. ↓

Index

4   | Great Tenochtitlan

19 | The Capital of New Spain

34 | Modern Mexico City

Author

Luis Alberto Martos

Photos by:

Giovanni Dagli Orti, Michael Calderwood


51 Photos-Illustrations
48 Pages
Softcover
22 x 12.5 cm – 8.66 x 4.92 in
ISBN 978 970 9019 49 0


Other languages
Englishfrançais

$99.00 Add to cart

Contents

Historical layers can still be seen in Mexico City: the Templo Mayor is a living vestige of ancient Tenochtitlán, the central district represents the permanence of the life of New Spain and the Palace of Fine Arts is a homage to the Porfirian era. Walking along its streets is moving from one epoch to another.

This guide documents with its photographs and illustrations all the historical phases of the city. In Cuicuilco, Templo Mayor or Tlatelolco some of the buildings of the pre-Hispanic cultures of the Valley of Mexico are still conserved. In the Historical Center you can visit, among other innumerable sites, the Cathedral, the Casa de los Azulejos, Santo Domingo Plaza or the College of San Ildefonso, buildings that still have viceregal resonance. Of the modern capital we can mention the National Museum of Anthropology, University City, the National Auditorium, the Tamayo Museum or the Latin-American Tower. In fact what is extraordinary is the possibility of being at all the historical stages of Mexico’s capital at the same time.

In many streets of the Center we can see colonial buildings beside nineteenth-century or modern ones. The passage of history can even be seen in the use of materials: adobe and volcanic rock in pre-Colombian ruins; quarry stone, marble, iron and wood in viceregal and Porfirian palaces; and aluminum, concrete and glass in 20th-century constructions.

Mexico City houses more than 20 million inhabitants and soon it will celebrate seven centuries of existence, a well-illustrated history in this guide.

Did you know that Mexico City, capital of the Aztec empire, will have been in existence for 700 years in 2025.

One of the pre-Hispanic peoples that attained enormous power was undoubtedly the Mexica or Aztec. After a long migration from the north of Mesoamerica to the High Plateau, it founded Tenochtitlán in 1325 A.D.

Share This