This nation, which exerted great dominion in war and strict control of tributes, in addition to possessing one of the most complex rituals, centralized power in the City of Tenochtitlán. Even so, despite their dizzying expansion, the development of the Mexicas from the foundation of the capital until the arrival of the Spaniards, is reduced to two centuries of existence (1325-1521 A.D.) Collections | Cultural Guides | Great Temple of Tenochtitlan

 

Great Temple Of Tenochtitlan

 

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Index

4   | Aztec Empire

12 | Sacred Precinct

28 | Museum of the Great Temple

30 | Room 1 – History of the Archaeology

32 | Room 2 – Ritual and Sacrifice

34 | Room 3 – Tribute and Trade

37 | Room 4 – Huitzilopochtli

40 | Room 5 – Tlaloc

43 | Room 6 – Flora and fauna

44 | Room 7 – Agriculture

47 |Room 8 – Historical Archaeology

Author

Ximena Chávez and Fernando Carrizosa

Photos by:

Giovanni Dagli Orti, Michael Calderwood


60 Photos-Illustrations
48 Pages
Softcover
22 x 12.5 cm – 8.66 x 4.92 in
ISBN 978 968 6434 54 5


Other languages
English

$99.00 Add to cart

Contents

One of the pre-Hispanic peoples that attained enormous power was undoubtedly the Mexicas, also known as the Tenochcas or Aztecs.

This nation, which exerted great dominion in war and strict control of tributes, in addition to possessing one of the most complex rituals, centralized power in the City of Tenochtitlán. Even so, despite their dizzying expansion, the development of the Mexicas from the foundation of the capital until the arrival of the Spaniards, is reduced to two centuries of existence (1325-1521 A.D.)

The first part of this work describes the history of the Mexica people, from their departure from the mythical Aztlán until their settlement in Chapultepec, the building of the Templo Mayor and the end of the empire, which succumbed to the Spanish conquest.

The second part presents the sacred precinct, with selected photographs of the monuments that make up the tour of the place, with emphasis on the architecture and the sculpture observed on site. The third part of the guide is a tour of the different rooms of the museum; this construction opened its doors in 1987 to display the archeological finds in the main buildings of the Great Tenochtitlán. Its design is the work of architect Pedro Ramírez Vázquez and evokes the layout of the Templo Mayor.

Its eight rooms exhibit original pieces of spectacular craftsmanship found in the offerings (large-scale ceramic sculptures, objects made of green stone, conch, obsidian, turquoise and gold, among others). These objects make it possible to know the mythical-religious art of what was one of the manifestations of pre-Hispanic Mexico: Mexica culture.

Did you know that the Templo Mayor was the symbolic center of the Mexica (Aztec) empire, a temple where the fiestas of the ritual calendar, exceptional ceremonies and human sacrifices were witnessed.

Dedicated to Huitzilopochtli, god of war, and Tláloc, god of rain, this building located in the center of the Great Tenochtitlán was related to the most important aspects of the political, religious and economic life of the Mexicas.

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