Cobá, which means “Choppy water” was in the epoch of its greatest flowering the most important city located in the northeast of the Yucatán Peninsula. Collections | Cultural Guides | Coba

 

Coba

 

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Index

4   | Geography of the Maya World

7   | Origins History

12 |social Organization

16 | Trade

18 | Religion

23 | The ballgame

26 | Writing Mathematics

28 | Astronomy

30 | Sculpture

34 | Pottery

36 | Paiting

38 | Architecture

44 | The Mayas of today

46 | Map of the Maya Culture

Author

Maria José Con

Photos by:

Giovanni Dagli Orti, Adalberto Rios


37 Photos-Illustrations
48 Pages
Softcover
22 x 12.5 cm – 8.66 x 4.92 in
ISBN 978 970 9019 44 5


Other languages
Englishfrançais Deutsch Nederlands

$99.00 Add to cart

 

Contents

Cobá, which means “Choppy water” was in the epoch of its greatest flowering the most important city located in the northeast of the Yucatán Peninsula.

Situated between two large lakes, the great city was joined by an extensive network of “sacbeoob” or avenues. Up to 50 of them have been found, the longest of which reaches Yaxuná, near the archeological site of Chichén Itzá more than 100 km from Cobá.

Its Nohoch Mul pyramid, 42 m high, is the highest in the Yucatán peninsula.

Another feature that distinguishes Cobá is the large number of sculpted steles from the Classic period (600-900 A.D.) with all the representations of personages standing with sumptuous clothing and adorned with necklaces, bracelets and spectacular headdresses. In their arms, the personages are holding a great scepter of command.

After a historical introduction to Mayan culture in general, and Cobá in time, this guide explains to the reader the particular characteristics of this archeological site. Below a tour of the zone is described, supported by a detailed plan which enables the reader, depending on the routes he chooses, to know one by one all the monuments with a detailed description of each building and stele. The text is complemented with numerous color photographs and drawings.

 

Did you know that the sacbé (sac, white; and bé, path), plural sacbeoob, is a raised paved path built by the Mayas.

These raised paths covered in white stucco or lime, from 4 to 20 m (13 to 66 ft) wide and up to 300 km (186 miles) long, connected plazas and temples within Mayan cities, although others connected cities between themselves. 

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