Chiapas’s indigenous populations, direct descendants of the ancient Mayas, still conserve their rich customs and traditions; today the Tzotzil, Tzeltal, Tojobal and Lacandón groups live in small towns such as San Juan Chamula, Zinacantán, Tenejapa, Oxchuc, Ocosingo and Lancajá.
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Chiapas

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Index

4   | The State of Chiapas

12 | Maya culture in Chiapas

28 | The colonial Period

35 | Peoples and Traditions

47 | Map of Chiapas

Author

Susana Vogel

Photos by:

Guillermo Aldana, Enrique Franco Torrijos


57 Photos-Illustrations
48 Pages
Softcover
22 x 12.5 cm – 8.66 x 4.92 in
ISBN 978 968 6434 61 3


Other languages
Englishfrançais

$99.00 Add to cart

Contents

Chiapas is undoubtedly one of the most beautiful and interesting states of the Mexican Republic.

Its territory combines mountains, tropical forests, plains, rivers, waterfalls and lagoons with the great archeological riches represented by its Mayan cities: Palenque, Yaxchilán, Bonampak, Toniná and Chincultic, without mentioning its splendid examples of colonial art.

The beautiful city of San Cristobal de las Casas, founded almost 500 years ago, concentrates a large part of the state’s magnificent viceregal buildings; outstanding, for example, is the Church of Santo Domingo, with its façade richly decorated in the 18th-century baroque style, and the beautiful façade of its cathedral, also baroque.

Chiapas’s indigenous populations, direct descendants of the ancient Mayas, still conserve their rich customs and traditions; today the Tzotzil, Tzeltal, Tojobal and Lacandón groups live in small towns such as San Juan Chamula, Zinacantán, Tenejapa, Oxchuc, Ocosingo and Lancajá.

The pages of this guide, supported by a documented text and selected photographs, are a illustrative journey through this state with an unmistakable personality.

Did you know that for centuries Chiapas lives to the rhythm of marimba music, an instrument of identity for the people of Chiapas.

When the first Spaniards arrived in the 16th century, the indigenous peoples produced music with woods from the forest and with the arrival of African slaves this musical expression was enriched with the contribution of the balafón. The current marimba was created in 1892 thanks to the talent and innovation of a man from Chiapas.

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